Peace enforcement – Pledge Peace http://pledgepeace.org/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 19:30:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://pledgepeace.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/cropped-icon-32x32.png Peace enforcement – Pledge Peace http://pledgepeace.org/ 32 32 2022 marks a dangerous year for law enforcement in Arizona, statistics show https://pledgepeace.org/2022-marks-a-dangerous-year-for-law-enforcement-in-arizona-statistics-show/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 04:57:19 +0000 https://pledgepeace.org/2022-marks-a-dangerous-year-for-law-enforcement-in-arizona-statistics-show/

2022 has been a particularly dangerous year for Arizona peace officers, as more than a dozen officers have been injured on duty since the start of the year.

So far in 2022, two officers have been shot and killed in the line of duty, including the Yavapai County Sheriff’s Deputy who was shot and killed on June 28. The first death of a peace officer occurred on June 2, when White Mountain Apache Police Department constable Adrian Lopez was shot and killed during a traffic check.

In addition to the two fatalities, more than a dozen officers statewide have been injured in the line of duty, since December 2021.

The shooting that seriously injured Phoenix police officer Tyler Moldovan occurred in the early morning hours of December 14, when officers investigating reports of an erratically driving vehicle found a matching car at an apartment complex near 15th Avenue and Camelback Road.

As police searched the area for the driver, Constable Moldovan, 22, found the suspect, identified as Essa Kolareh Eugene Williams, 24, hiding behind an apartment patio wall.

Court documents show that Moldovan was shot eight times, including one in the head.

“Subject was on the phone to tell someone he was going to jail,” read part of the court documents. “[Moldovan] asked subject if he had any weapons and he said no. The male subject pulled a handgun from his waist, pointed it at the officer, and fired several times.”

The Moldovan officer fell to the ground and the suspect continued to shoot him “as he lay on the ground unresponsive”.

After the shooting, Williams allegedly attempted to remove Moldovan’s handgun from its holster before being tackled by another officer.

The Moldovan officer was initially on life support in extremely critical condition, but in January 2022, the department announced that Agent Moldovan was released from the hospital and sent to a rehab facility. In June, it was reported that The Moldovan officer returned home.

In one incident in February, 9 Phoenix police officers were injured during a barricade situation.

Of the nine officers injured, four were shot.

Phoenix police officials said at the time that the incident began after a woman was allegedly shot in a home just after 2 a.m. on February 11. In a critical incident briefing released Feb. 25, Phoenix police officials said it was the suspect in the shooting, identified as 36-year-old Morris Richard Jones III, who called police, claiming that his wife had been shot by an intruder.

When an officer approached the house, Jones allegedly invited him inside before shooting him repeatedly in an ambush.

“The first officer was shot several times. He was the most seriously injured. Not life threatening. At this time it is expected that he will survive,” said Phoenix Police Sergeant. Andy Williams.

“Chilling because there was no opportunity for my officer to do what he was trained to do,” Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams said.

Reinforcement officers later arrived and surrounded the house, with Jones barricaded inside.

At some point during the clash, a man inside the house, since identified as the victim’s brother, came out and placed a baby on the floor before being arrested. The female victim has been identified as Shatifah Lobley, 29, of Phoenix. This man was seen on video walking outside dropping off the child, then walking towards police with his hands in the air. Police officials said they arrested the man and that he is cooperating with investigators.

“Family members have confirmed to our detectives that the baby is one month old and is a shared child between Lobley and suspect Morris Richard Jones,” Phoenix police said in a Feb. 12 news release.

As officers approached the house to retrieve the baby, the shooter opened fire. Eventually the police were able to get inside the house and found Jones dead with Lobley.

This shooting, which injured Phoenix police officer Denise Bruce-Jones, occurred on April 14 at a convenience store near Cave Creek and Beardsley Roads. At the store, officers said a woman called them, saying she had gone to the gas station to meet with officers and tell them about the situation because she was too scared to meet at her home.

“They were there for a while, talking to a lady. I turn my back when [I hear] shots, maybe 10 of them, and seeing an officer fall,” witness Gary Macagni said.

Witnesses saw one officer jump over the other for cover, but the damage was already done.

“They took an ambulance down the street over there, with about four or five police cars following the ambulance,” Gene Onstein said.

Bruce-Jones, 40, was shot at least once in the stomach. For a while, a blue alert was issued for the suspect, identified as Nicholas Cowan. The alert was later cancelled. Cowan was later arrested following a barricade situation at a property near 66th Street and Osborn Road in Scottsdale.

In an incident on June 14, a Phoenix police detective was taken to hospital after being shot multiple times by two men, officials said.

The incident occurred in south of phoenix, just before 12:15 p.m. near 39th Avenue and Baseline Road, when a detective was conducting a follow-up investigation inside an unmarked car. While the detective was inside her car, a vehicle stopped and slowed down beside her before continuing on the road. Shortly after, the same vehicle returned to the area and drove past the detective’s car again. The vehicle then stopped behind the detective’s car and two men got out.

“Both men got out of the car with handguns drawn and pulled masks over their faces,” said Sgt. said Philip Krynsky. “Through the rear view mirror, the detective was able to see the actions of the two men and proceeded to put on her police ballistic vest and draw her handgun.”

One of the men stood in front of the detective’s car, while the other stood in front of the passenger door.

The two men then fired 19 shots at the car, hitting the detective multiple times as she exited her vehicle.

“Due to his injuries, the detective was unable to return fire.” sergeant. Krynsky added.

After the shooting, the two men ran to their car. The detective was able to call for help on his radio. The two suspects, identified as Ahmani Gordon, 22, and Aaron Ware, 22, were later arrested and jailed for attempted first degree murder.

Police officials said the shot officer was a 19-year veteran of the department and his ballistic vest saved his life.

Police union officials demand change

As more police are injured on duty, Phoenix Law Enforcement Association officials are demanding change.

“It’s mind-boggling, so it’s time to stand up as a community and say we stand with our police, and enough is enough,” said PLEA’s Darrell Kriplean. “It’s heartbreaking. It’s something I’ve never experienced in 28 years as a police officer. This year is something.”

Recently, the Phoenix police created an entire division to suppress gun violence. Ministry officials said homicide cases with firearms have increased by 45% this year compared to the same period last year.

The increase in gun crime is not unique to Phoenix, as similar increases are occurring in other parts of the country.

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U.S. Forest Service law enforcement vehicles park near the Rainbow Family of Living Light gathering in Adams Park.
John F. Russell / Steamboat Pilot and Today

Hilary Markin, public information manager for the National Rainbow Incident Management Team, reported that U.S. Forest Service law enforcement officers had issued 91 enforcement actions so far. Monday, June 27 to participants in the 50e Rainbow Gathering anniversary at Adams Park in northern Routt County.

Markin said the enforcement actions covered issues such as damage to natural resources, inoperable equipment, possession or distribution of narcotics, aggravated assault on a peace officer, criminal in possession of firearm and an officer’s resistance or escape.

“A lot of it ends up being investigated, and I can’t divulge any additional information,” Markin said Tuesday of the enforcement action.



“Most of our interactions with family members (Rainbow) have been educational in nature and have not resulted in any enforcement action being taken,” Markin noted. “It’s been relatively quiet.”

Routt County Deputy Sheriff Doug Scherar said two people at the Rainbow Gathering were arrested on Sunday, June 26 after coming into contact with sheriff’s deputies following law enforcement issues on the circulation. The men, both in their 30s, were found to have outstanding minor warrants from outside Routt County, Scherar said.



During the 2021 National Rainbow Gathering which took place about half an hour south of Taos in the Carson National Forest and drew 7,000 attendees, authorities issued 600 enforcement actions, including arrests, tickets, written warnings and incident reports documenting a situation, Markin said.

Markin said the total costs associated with the 2021 National Rainbow Incident Management Team were approximately $535,000, including law enforcement costs and Forest Service administrative costs.

U.S. Forest Service officials and law enforcement officers walk with Rainbow Gathering representatives during a tour of the resource management site at Adams Park on June 17.
Suzie Romig / Steamboat Pilot and Today

Attendance at the Rainbow Gathering at Adams Park was estimated at 2,500 as of Monday, June 27.

“We will see the numbers increase throughout this week with the high point coming on July 4,” Markin said.

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Deadline is approaching to apply for SRSU law enforcement academy https://pledgepeace.org/deadline-is-approaching-to-apply-for-srsu-law-enforcement-academy/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 21:30:09 +0000 https://pledgepeace.org/deadline-is-approaching-to-apply-for-srsu-law-enforcement-academy/

The application deadline for enrollment in Sul Ross State University H. Joaquin Jackson Law Enforcement Academy 2022 is July 1, according to a press release.

The academy offers two types of training programs. A Basic Police Academy is held annually and exceeds the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement’s 96-hour Basic Peace Officer Course requirements.

Cadets who successfully complete the basic police academy are eligible to take the TCOLE Basic Peace Officer exam. Those who pass this exam with a score of 70% or higher are then certified by TCOLE and can be hired by Texas law enforcement.

Second, the academy provides continuing education and training to law enforcement and corrections personnel in the Sul Ross State University service area. A variety of courses ranging from four hours to 40 hours are offered each semester.

These courses are designed to meet the training requirements mandated by TCOLE and to meet the unique training needs of agencies in the region.

More than 600 cadets have graduated from Sul Ross Academy since its inception in 1982 with a 100% employment rate, primarily by West Texas law enforcement, for those who pass the TCOLE BPOC.

For non-Sul Ross State students, tuition is $4,990 for the semester, which runs from August through December each year.

SRSU students who need credit hours to earn a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice or homeland security can earn up to 12 hours at the academy and receive both their diploma and their peace officer’s license . Graduate students can earn up to three credit hours for the same two degrees. They can also take advantage of reduced tuition fees.

To complete the prescreening application, visit tinyurl.com/yd3k4ec4.

For more information call 432-837-8166 or email [email protected]

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EIGHT FULL NSCC LAW ENFORCEMENT ACADEMY https://pledgepeace.org/eight-full-nscc-law-enforcement-academy/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 11:42:16 +0000 https://pledgepeace.org/eight-full-nscc-law-enforcement-academy/
Pictured are the graduates of the Northwest State Community College Law Enforcement Academy: (front, left to right): Ali Sabri Uthumalebbe, Lane Good, Jacob Spiess and Courtney Eddings; (back, lr): Joshua Buchenberg, Jacob Trejo, Justin Smith and Andrew Fritch.

Eight graduates of the Northwest State Community College Law Enforcement Academy were honored last night at a special ceremony. The class passed both the state certification exam and the physical fitness requirements of the program. Graduates will now take the Ohio Peace Officer Training Association (OPOTA) 200-question certification exam, which is a requirement to become a law enforcement officer in the State of Ohio.

The following graduates were awarded:

Defiance County: Justin Smith (Ney)

Fulton County: Courtney Eddings (Wauseon)

Henry County: Joshua Buchenberg (Napoleon), Lane Good (Napoleon)

Lucas County: Ali Sabri Uthumalebbe (Toledo)

Williams County: Andrew Fritch (Stryker), Jacob Spiess (Bryan), Jacob Trejo (West Unity)

Several students from the promotion received additional recognition:

Top Gun Award: Joshua Buchenberg

Best Driver Award: Andrew Fritch

Deputy Allen D. Ohlrich Award for Outstanding Cadets: Jacob Trejo

The Northwest State Community College Law Enforcement Academy is an eight-month program offered annually. Classes are held Monday through Friday from 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. and Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. A new class is being formed and is expected to start in August. For more information about the academy, contact the NSCC Admissions Team at 419.267.1320 or visit NorthwestState.edu online.

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California law enforcement will receive $1,500 pandemic bonuses https://pledgepeace.org/california-law-enforcement-will-receive-1500-pandemic-bonuses/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://pledgepeace.org/california-law-enforcement-will-receive-1500-pandemic-bonuses/

Law enforcement and other public safety officers employed by California are set to receive $1,500 pandemic bonuses after Governor Gavin Newsom and unions reach agreements.

According to the agreements released Friday, the state will distribute bounties to public safety officers, including California Highway Patrol officers, state corrections officers and park rangers.

Agreements have been reached with the California Correctional Peace Officers Assn., the California Assn. of Highway Patrolmen and the California Statewide Law Enforcement Assn., subject to approval by the Legislature, said Camille Travis, spokeswoman for the state Department of Human Resources.

The total cost of the bonuses and the number of employees who will receive them have not been finalized. Departments will assess employee eligibility, and the state will not know the final amount of funding until agreements are ratified and payments are made, Travis said.

“Once again, I am thrilled to see that this administration understands the value of the services provided by all Unit 7 classifications,” said California Statewide Law Enforcement Assn. said chairman Alan Barcelona in a press release. “It expands the benefits we’ve been able to negotiate during the pandemic.”

Workers must have been employed by the state on January 1 and continue their employment until July 1 to be eligible. The bonuses are a one-time payment that will not count towards the retirement compensation, according to the letters of agreement.

The California Statewide Law Enforcement Assn. also noted that workers will receive the bonus whether they worked in person or remotely, and that employees should expect to receive the payments during their July or August pay periods.

After a $1.9 trillion federal coronavirus relief package signed in March 2021 allocated $350 billion to state, local and tribal governments, the Newsom administration vowed to hold talks with most state employee unions regarding pandemic bonuses once the US Treasury Department finalizes the guidelines, which were released this year.

The final guidelines underscored that government employees are entitled to additional pay in the event of a pandemic, which launched formal discussions between Newsom’s administration and unions, which argued that many public safety employees had to put themselves at risk by working during the pandemic.

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Miami Heat, D2C and Law Enforcement Join Forces to Combat Distrust of Community Policing https://pledgepeace.org/miami-heat-d2c-and-law-enforcement-join-forces-to-combat-distrust-of-community-policing/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 00:11:33 +0000 https://pledgepeace.org/miami-heat-d2c-and-law-enforcement-join-forces-to-combat-distrust-of-community-policing/

The Miami Heat partnered with the City of Miami Police Department and the nonprofit Dedication to Community (D2C) in April in an attempt to mend the relationship between the Miami community and their officers.

Program training includes workshops with instruction and discussion between community members and police officers led by D2C Founder and CEO Mr. Quentin Williams and Co-Facilitator Kim Varner Sr. With one-to-one, individual and large-group, solutions-based conversations program aims to create a safe space for both parties to openly communicate and build rapport with each other.

Darrell Blocker, ABC News contributor, retired CIA agent and current board member of Peace 4 Kids, an advocacy group for youth in foster care, says the work of bridging the gap between the community and the police through programs like this is a grassroots effort.

“Trust wasn’t lost overnight,” Blocker told ABC News. “It all comes down to opening channels of communication.”

Dedication to Community (D2C) Founder Mr. Quentin Williams is seen in this photo.

Miami Heat

Williams, a federal prosecutor and former FBI agent, is the common thread between communities and law enforcement. He grew up in what he called a tough time in Yonkers, New York in the late 80s when the crack epidemic was already ravaging New York.

“I didn’t want to be a cop,” Williams told ABC News. “I saw my friends being taken to jail by cops.”

Ultimately, it was this “disparity and treatment” that drove Williams to later become an FBI agent. Even as an officer, he says his badge did not protect him from the discriminatory experience of being profiled by a fellow officer. In the summer of 1994, he said he found himself “in the back of a cruiser stopped for matching someone else’s description earlier that day”.

Williams says the experience coupled with his background has informed how he approaches law enforcement training.

“I’m not just talking about cops and the community, I’m talking about human beings,” Williams said. “Dignity costs nothing to give.”

PHOTO: Community participants and officers chat during the training.

Participants and community agents discuss during the training.

Miami Heat

Officers like Tim Shaw, police chief in Stamford, Connecticut, say they are linked to Williams’ training. Shaw met Williams at the 2020 Fairfield County Police Chiefs Quarterly Meeting. Following a mandate issued by the state of Connecticut requiring all officers to undergo implicit bias training, Shaw called on Williams to come train the 275 of its officers. For him, Williams and his storytelling represented “the right person in the room who can relate to the officers and his staff.”

Previously, officers and community members attended the training separately, but the program has since evolved to encourage engagement between the two groups. According to Williams, the more comprehensive training emphasizes community compliance and officer professionalism.

“Not all officers are as open about it as others are,” Shaw told ABC News.

Studies have long exposed the unfairly disproportionate treatment of blacks and browns by law enforcement in the United States that has gone on for centuries.

“We use our unique position in our own city to act as a bridge between the community and the police,” Lorrie-Ann Diaz, Miami Heat’s vice president of corporate communications and social responsibility, told ABC News.

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WSCC Celebrates 124th Regional Enforcement Course | Local News https://pledgepeace.org/wscc-celebrates-124th-regional-enforcement-course-local-news/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 04:45:00 +0000 https://pledgepeace.org/wscc-celebrates-124th-regional-enforcement-course-local-news/

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City of Graham and county law enforcement to pay $336,900 to settle 2020 protest https://pledgepeace.org/city-of-graham-and-county-law-enforcement-to-pay-336900-to-settle-2020-protest/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 21:17:39 +0000 https://pledgepeace.org/city-of-graham-and-county-law-enforcement-to-pay-336900-to-settle-2020-protest/

A settlement has been reached in a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina against the Graham Police Department and the Alamance County Sheriff’s Department, which alleged excessive use of the force by the police against demonstrators during a march for the right to vote. The City of Graham, the Graham Police Department and the county sheriff will pay $336,900 to the group of plaintiffs represented by the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights under the law.

The lawsuit was filed days after Alamance County Sheriff’s Deputies and Graham Police protesters sprayed with pepper sprayincluding children and the elderly, for blocking a street without permission during the “I am the March of change at the polls” on Oct. 31, 2020. According to the lawsuit, police violated defendants’ First Amendment rights to speech, assembly, and association, as well as their Fourth Amendment rights protecting them from excessive use of force .

The ACLU announced in a Press release Wednesday that it was “an important victory for police accountability and transparency”. As part of the settlement, Graham Police Chief Kristy Cole also agreed to have a formal meeting with all consenting plaintiffs within 60 days of the release of the trial settlement.

In a statement from the Graham Police Department, reported to the Burlington Times-News, they said the reason for the settlement was that “it is in the best interests of our community to settle the trial fairly and avoid the costs of ‘protracted litigation’.

The ACLU alleged in the lawsuit that the pepper spray rendered some protesters physically and mentally unable to vote, as the incident occurred on the last day of early voting in the 2020 general election.

Among the plaintiffs is Justice 4 the Next Generation, a group of community organizations fighting against racial inequality, founded by the Reverend Greg Drumwright. One of the lead plaintiffs in the case, Drumwright, was quoted in the press release as saying Justice 4 the Next Generation is committed to addressing systemic racial oppression.

“I was raised in Alamance County and this will always be my home. Their attempts to silence the voices of peaceful protesters are all too familiar,” Drumwright said. said in a statement. “Although we have reached an agreement with the county, the city of Graham and law enforcement, we are keenly aware that we still have a long way to go before we achieve true equality and justice.”


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‘Running 4 Heroes’ Will Pay Tribute To Law Enforcement During A Visit To The Piedmont Triad https://pledgepeace.org/running-4-heroes-will-pay-tribute-to-law-enforcement-during-a-visit-to-the-piedmont-triad/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 19:28:00 +0000 https://pledgepeace.org/running-4-heroes-will-pay-tribute-to-law-enforcement-during-a-visit-to-the-piedmont-triad/ A nonprofit that helps injured and deceased first responders travels from Florida to the Piedmont Triad this weekend to present a grant to a local officer who was shot in the line of duty and honor a firefighter deceased. The nonprofit “Running 4 Heroes” was started by 13-year-old Zechariah Cartledge. When Zacharie was just 9 years old, he decided to honor first responders by running 1 mile while holding a thin blue flag. “I do this because I think it’s important that we show respect and appreciation to our injured and fallen first responders,” Cartledge said. In his hometown and across the country, he has traveled thousands of miles for fallen first responders. This weekend in Kernersville will be Zacharie’s 1,255th mile for Bethany firefighter Brandon Yaeger, who died just weeks ago. Cartledge will also present a grant to former Kernersville police officer Sean Houle, who was shot 3 times in the line of duty last year. He has since retired from medical practice but has continued to assist law enforcement by teaching classes. “It was 10 years of my life,” said former Kernersville police officer Sean Houle. Houle added, “Being a first responder is all I did professionally from 18 to 32. It’s all I’ve done with my life. And I didn’t want to let it go.” Houle said he was surprised a few weeks ago when he received a call from Cartledge’s father saying he had received a grant. “It’s Out of nowhere, it was really special,” Houle said. Houle added, “To know that I can meet him and Zachariah, which is really special for me. Not just because he’s doing this for me, but for what he’s doing for so many other first responders across the country.” Houle will be the 32nd recipient of “Running 4 Heroes” Injured First Responders Grant. “I bet if he could return to duty, he would. That’s why we’re giving this grant because of his dedication and bravery in continuing to help his service, even though he got injured,” said Cartledge. Over the past year and a half, Houle has had a dozen surgeries, just one a few days ago. He said this grant would help him and his family tremendously. It will just give peace of mind to my family and me.” Houle is encouraging community members to run, walk, or just cheer on Zechariah on Saturday. It will take place around 8 a.m. in front of the Kernersville Town Hall and conclude at the Kernersville Elementary School Members of the service Bethany Fire Department and Kernersville Police Department will be in attendance.

A nonprofit that helps injured and deceased first responders travels from Florida to the Piedmont Triad this weekend to present a grant to a local officer who was shot in the line of duty and honor a firefighter deceased.

The nonprofit “Running 4 Heroes” was started by 13-year-old Zechariah Cartledge.

When Zacharie was just 9 years old, he decided to honor first responders by running 1 mile while holding a thin blue flag.

“I do this because I think it’s important that we show respect and appreciation to our injured and fallen first responders,” Cartledge said.

In his hometown and across the country, he has traveled thousands of miles for fallen first responders. This weekend in Kernersville will be Zacharie’s 1,255th mile for Bethany firefighter Brandon Yaeger, who died just weeks ago.

Cartledge will also present a grant to former Kernersville Police Officer Sean Houle, who was shot 3 times in the line of duty last year. He has since retired from medical practice but has continued to assist law enforcement by teaching classes.

“It was 10 years of my life,” said former Kernersville police officer Sean Houle. Houle added, “Being a first responder is all I did professionally from 18 to 32. It’s all I’ve done with my life. And I didn’t want to let it go let it.”

Houle said he was surprised a few weeks ago when he received a call from Cartledge’s father saying he had received a grant.

“It came out of nowhere, it was really special,” Houle said. Houle added, “To know that I can meet him and Zachariah, which is really special for me. Not just because he does this for me, but for what he does for so many other first responders in across the country.”

Houle will be the 32nd “Running 4 Heroes” recipient of the Injured First Responder Grant.

“I bet if he could return to his duties, he would. That’s why we’re giving this grant because of his dedication and bravery to continue to help his department, even though he got injured,” Cartledge said.

Over the past year and a half, Houle has had a dozen surgeries, including one just days ago. He said this grant would help him and his family tremendously.

Houle said: “Not everything is covered and so that’s going to help tremendously with the cost of this most recent operation. It’s just going to give me and my family peace of mind.”

Houle encourages community members to run, walk, or just cheer on Zacharie on Saturday. It will take place around 8 am in front of the town hall of Kernersville and will end at the elementary school of Kernersville.

Members of the Bethany Fire Department and Kernersville Police Department will be in attendance.

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Law enforcement reports for June 14 | Local News https://pledgepeace.org/law-enforcement-reports-for-june-14-local-news/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 20:18:19 +0000 https://pledgepeace.org/law-enforcement-reports-for-june-14-local-news/

Meridian Police Department

The Meridian Police Department reported the following arrests between 6 a.m. Tuesday and 6 a.m. Wednesday.

• Simple Aggression – Janece Rogers, b. 2001, 4608 Pacific St., Meridian.

• Domestic Violence – Rakeith R. Watson, b. 1988, 5016 37th St., Meridian.

• Common assault/threats/two counts – Jonathan M. Johnson, born in 1988, 1211 27th Ave. Apt. 1, meridian. Johnson is also charged with stalking and telephone harassment.

• Indecent Exposure – Richard L. Chandler Jr., b. 1970, 1107 35th Ave., Meridian.

• Simple assault/threat – Glen E. Barfield, b. 1965, 3001 40th Ave., Meridian.

• Contributing to Child Delinquency – Vanessa F. Dean, born 1985, 3824 36th Ave., Meridian.

• Drunk Audience – Richard L. Chandler Jr., b. 1970, 1107 35th Ave., Meridian.

• Shoplifting/Walmart – Tommy L. Wiley III, born 1994, 5224 Valley St., Meridian. Wiley III is also accused of giving false information.

• DUI/Other – William B. Johnson, b. 1985, 5990 Graham Cemetery Rd., Meridian. Johnson is also charged with possession of a controlled substance.

• Domestic Violence – Johnny L. Leggett, b. 1972, 608 17th St., Meridian.

• DUI/other – Calvin C. Wilson, born in 1987, 5404 1st Ave., Meridian. Wilson is also charged with possession of a controlled substance, possession of marijuana.

• Disorderly Conduct – Kynidi A. Dorris, b. 2002, Meridian.

• Trouble the Peace – Gregory A. Gosnell, born 1984, homeless.

• DUI/other – Johnta R. Fowler, born 1975, 1723 16th St., Meridian.

• Domestic Violence – John W. Bennoman, b. 1967, 182 Lancaster Rd., Dekalb.

• Simple assault – Dylan A. Criddle, born in 1999, 5118 Manning St., Meridian. Criddle is also charged with petty larceny.

• Domestic Violence – Brierra Smith, b. 1991, 803 29th St. Apt. 423, Meridian.

• Domestic Violence – Larry Smith, b. 1994, 2325 34th Ave., Meridian. • Malicious Mischief – Antonyo D. Mason, b. 1989, 302 A Sam Hurt Rd., Toomsuba.

• Child Abuse – Devonte M. Priester, b. 1998, 7100 Old Hwy. 80W app. A7, Meridian.

• Possession of accessories – Fredez L. Clark, born in 1993, 626 21st St. Apt. 21, meridian. Clark is also charged with disorderly conduct.

Incident reports

The Meridian Police Department reported the following incidents Tuesday through Wednesday.

Stolen vehicles

• 3400 block of Parkway Blvd., 2:35 a.m.

• Block 5500 of North Lake Dr., 9:32 am

Car burglary

• 2300 block of South Frontage Rd., 5:30 a.m.

• Block 4800 of Royal Rd., 4:29 a.m.

• 100 blocks from the freeway. 11/80, 11:26

Residential burglary

• 3600 block from 39th Street, 8:43 a.m.

Flight

• 2900 block of South Frontage Rd., 2:18 p.m.

Car burglary

• 100 blocks from the freeway. 11/80, 7:43 a.m.

shootings

• Block 2700 of 10th Street, 8:34 p.m.

• Meridian Police responded to 18 shots, but when officers arrived at the scene, only 2 showed evidence found to support the calls.

Lauderdale County Sheriff’s Department

The Lauderdale County Sheriff’s Department reported the following arrests at 6 a.m. Tuesday and 6 a.m. Wednesday.

• Felon in possession of a firearm – Drevonte Marquel Armour, 40, 4605 Arthur St., Meridian.

• Aggravated Assault/Domestic Violence – Sherrod Grace, 24, 2427 4th Ave., Meridian.

• Violation of Probation/Parole – Joshua Robert Simmonds, 30, 5867 Centerhill Rd., Collinsville.

• DUI/Second Offense – Joel Arias, 70, 8827 Whippoorwill Rd., Meridian. Arias is also accused of non-compliance with the traffic device, no driver’s license, leaving the scene of an accident, no civil liability insurance.

• DUI/Second Offense – John Edward Bell III, 38, 1735 Bunk Newell, Meridian. Bell is also charged with Lack of Driver’s License, Expired License Tag, Reckless Driving, Failure to Pay/Two Counts.

• Malicious Mischief/Vandalism – Kelvin DeJusus Ephrim Jr., 20, 1318 Will Wright Rd., Meridian.

• Possession of controlled substances – Nathaniel Blake Henry, 24, homeless.

• Flight and Escape in Motor Vehicle/Two Counts – Guy Wilson McRae, 37, 2414 25th St., Meridian. McRae is also charged with possession of a controlled substance, receiving stolen property/felony.

• Larceny – Summer Nicole West Taylor, 43, 373 Jeffery Acres Rd., Meridian.

• Rape/statutory/two counts – James Michael Wilkins, 49, 1171 Private Rd. 5500, Uvalde, Texas.

Incident reports

The Lauderdale County Sheriff’s Department reported the following incidents Tuesday through Wednesday.

Security checkpoint

• Motorway. 39/Daleville Prismatic Rd.

Flight

• Constitution Avenue.

• Jeffery Acres Road.

Shooting

• JO Thomas Road.

Wanted Pickup

• Jeffery Acres Road.

Accident no injuries

• Lauderdale Road.

• Old 8th St. Rd/Whippoorwill Rd.

traffic stop

• Old road. 19SE.

Disturbance

• Motorway. 45N/Thornton Rd.

fire races

Meridian Fire Services reported the following calls Tuesday through Wednesday.

• Canceled on medical scene – 1930 26.

• Extraction of victim(s) from the vehicle – 104 Skyland.

• Gas leak – 8235 Eagle Pointe.

• Medical assistance, assistance to the EMS team – 5404 10th; 2838 14th.

• Unauthorized burning – 3100 38e.

• Activation of the CO detector due to a malfunction – 2700 24e.

• EMS call, excluding vehicle accident with injured – 211 Windmill; 295 Old Country Club.

• No incident noted upon arrival at dispatch address – 154 Interstate 20/59 EB.

• Not reported – 134 North Hills; 1799 10th; 4000 34th; 4315 highway. 39; 901 1st; 107 71st; 6116 Oakland Heights; 6225 m.

The Lauderdale County Volunteer Fire Department reported the following calls Tuesday through Wednesday.

• Structural fire – Johnson Lane (Long Creek, Clarkdale, Southeast).

• Accident with injuries – Interstate 59 (South).

Ambulance races

Metro Ambulance reported 48 emergency runs as of 2 p.m. Tuesday and 48 emergency runs

Wednesday at 2 p.m.

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