Central Coast Law Enforcement Must List Military Style Gear

Central Coast and state law enforcement agencies are now required to list their military-grade equipment and make this information publicly available. Assembly Bill 841 monitors and controls this equipment and the governor signed the bill into law last September. The Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Office hosted a community zoom meeting to explain the law Monday night at 6:30 p.m. and release information about the proposed policy for funding, acquiring, and using equipment. organizations and listen to what they have to say about the weapons they have,” said Veterans for Peace member Lee Brokaw. He criticizes law enforcement’s use of military-grade equipment. He says it shows a strong show of force when driving through neighborhoods with large caliber firearms and armored vehicles. “All of these weapons that are on these lists are intended for use against the citizens of the community where these officers are supposed to be peacekeepers. . Not military officers.” “The interesting thing about this Assembly bill is that they designate items that they consider military-style equipment,” said Santa Cruz County Sgt. Daniel Robbins. .Some of them are command and control items like the bomb squad vehicle.But the department also has bola wraps, drones and flashbangs. things: one being the policy and ordinance being established for the use of military style equipment and these must be approved by a government entity which in our case is the gentlemen oversight board. “said Robbins. The Santa Cruz Police Department is also working on its list of military-style equipment. It should be released next week. One of those items is the “bear cat” armored vehicle that security interior provided back in 2016 at no cost to the city. But there was a lot of public outcry upon his arrival. “I think we’re all open to productive conversations and suggestions, but at the same time, it There are good facilities that keep our community and our officers safe,” said Acting Santa Cruz Police Chief Bernie Escalante. Santa Cruz County on March 22. The police department will present them to the public safety committee on March 23. Eventually, it’ll be sent to City Council for their approval in April.

Central Coast and state law enforcement agencies are now required to list their military-style gear and make that information available for public review.

Assembly Bill 841 monitors and controls this equipment and the governor signed the bill into law last September.

The Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Office hosted a community zoom meeting to explain the law Monday night at 6:30 p.m. and release information about the proposed policy for funding, acquiring and using equipment.

“I think it’s a godsend that Sacramento has given us the opportunity to meet with these agencies first and hear what they have to say about the weapons they have,” said Lee Brokaw, a member of Veterans for Peace.

He criticizes law enforcement’s use of military-grade equipment. He says it shows a strong show of force when driving through neighborhoods with large caliber firearms and armored vehicles.

“All of these weapons that are on these lists are for use against the citizens of the community where these officers are supposed to be peace officers. Not military officers.”

“The interesting thing about this Assembly bill is that they designate items that they consider military-style equipment,” said Santa Cruz County Sgt. Daniel Robbins.

The Sheriff’s Office has about 20 items that qualify as military-style gear.

Some of them are command and control elements like the bomb squad vehicle.

But the department also has bola wraps, drones, and flashbangs.

“What this bill was really about was transparency and accountability of law enforcement. And so this bill outlines two things: one being the policy and the order established for the use of military-style equipment and they must be approved by a government entity, which in our case is the board of supervisors,” says Robbins.

The Santa Cruz Police Department is also working on its list of military-style equipment.

It should be released next week.

One such item is the “bear cat” armored vehicle that Homeland Security provided in 2016 at no cost to the city. But there was a lot of public outcry when he arrived.

“I think we’re all open to having productive conversations and suggestions, but at the same time there’s good equipment out there that keeps our community and our officers safe.” said Acting Santa Cruz Police Chief Bernie Escalante.

The sheriff’s office is scheduled to present its information to the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors on March 22. The police department will present them to the public safety committee on March 23. Finally, they will be sent to the municipal council for approval. in April.

About Michael C. Lovelace

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